Possible complications from the insertion of pellets include; minor bleeding or bruising, discoloration of the skin, infection, and the possible extrusion of the pellet. Other than slight bruising, or discoloration of the skin, these complications are rare.

  • Women: Testosterone may cause a slight increase in facial hair in some women. This issue resolves as the dosage is decreased. Women do NOT “grow a penis” even with a large over dosage of testosterone! Voice lowering occurs only at extremely high levels and returns to normal as the levels decline.
  • Men: Testosterone stimulates the bone marrow and increases the production of red blood cells. A low testosterone level in older men is a cause of anemia. Testosterone, delivered by implants or other methods, can cause an elevation in the red blood cells. If the hemoglobin and hematocrit (blood count) get too high, a unit of blood may be donated.

After the insertion of the implants, vigorous physical activity is avoided for 48 hours in women and up to 5 to 7 days in men. Early physical activity is a cause of ‘extrusion’, which is a pellet working its way out. Antibiotics may be prescribed if a patient is diabetic or has had a joint replaced. However, this is a ‘clean procedure’ and antibiotics are not usually needed.